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Posts Tagged ‘skin irritation’

goat milk soap

When I receive questions that I think others will benefit from I like to post them here. 

These are some recently asked questions:

Is your goat milk soap considered a body or facial soap?

  • Both.  When I create a soap I keep skin types in mind.  Some of the soaps are good for oily or combination skin (such as lemongrass, cedarwood).  Some are a good match-up for skin blemishes (such as lemongrass, patchouli, or tea tree). Some of the soaps are less drying, great for mature or dry skin (examples are:  unscented or honey oatmeal soaps, lavender, and orange mint).

Can your soaps be used as a shaving cream replacement?

  • Yes, I consider the lather from my soaps to have a thick luxurious feel.  This enables a smooth shave with less skin irritation, resulting in less nicks and chafing.  Honey oatmeal, for example, provides a wonderful rich lather that leaves the skin less irritated (as compared to shaving cream).

Do any of your soaps contain an exfoliant to assist with dead skin removal while cleansing?

  • Yes, the honey oatmeal is very mildy exfoliating.  The lemongrass poppyseed contains a natural exfoliant, poppyseeds. ,

Are any of your soaps or lotions helpful to those with”special or sensitive” skin conditions?

  • When using a new product I advise the client to 1) begin using the product in a small test area, 2) use the product sparingly, 3) overall body use must begin gradually. 
  • I suggest, when a person has tried many products that have failed, to give your skin a rest.  Try one product at a time.  There is something to be said about goat milk soaps and lotions, with their  lack of detergents and chemicals, but I cannot say they cure, heal or treat any certain condition.   Results (if any) depend upon your personal skin type.  Always consult with your physician!

If you have anything to add, please jump in and voice your comments. 

If you have questions, this is a great place to ask, someone else may be wanting to know the same thing!

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With H1N1 on the scene, people are washing their hands more frequently and are using antibacterial products more often as well.

With frequent hand-washing, I recommend products that are natural, or as natural as possible. 

Dry your hands completely between washing.  Do not expose your hands to extreme cold temperatures while damp.

When bathing, do not use overly hot water.  Hot water tends to sap the skin of its natural oils.  When the hands and skin become stripped of natural oils, they are more susceptible to bacteria and skin irritation.  Skin allergies can also flare following over-washing of hands.

Use products that moisturize the skin often.  Products that contain natural oils are beneficial to dry skin in the coldest of seasons.  They can provide a thin protective barrier to the elements.   

I read an article, and have chosen to not link to it, that advised readers to not use a bottle of soap if it lists “soap” on the label.  I disagree with part of that statement.  Soap that is just that, soap, and not a detergent, is better for sensitive skin than a soap that contains detergents and surfactants.  A “true” soap simply does just that, it cleanses the skin without additives that may/or may not irritate your skin.

I have talked about anti-bacterial products before, and I am not going to dive back into them in-depth today.  In my opinion, for your own immune system to work properly (to not develop immunities), and for the environment’s sake, I personally avoid anti-bacterial products.

Simple skin care…less irritating, the bottom line.

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